Wim De Neys is a Research Director at the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS). After earning his Ph.D. in cognitive psychology at the University of Leuven (Belgium) and post-doctoral training at the University of California Santa Barbara (USA) and York University (Toronto, Canada) he joined CNRS in 2009. In his work on human thinking, he uses a combination of behavioural, neuroscientific and developmental methods to unravel how intuitive and deliberate thought processes interact.

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De Neys

Ph.D

Full researcher

CNRS

PUBLICATIONS

De Neys, W. (2021). On Dual- and Single-Process Models of Thinking. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 16(6), 1412–1427. https://doi.org/10.1177/1745691620964172

Boissin, E., Caparos, S., Raoelison, M., & De Neys, W. (2021). From bias to sound intuiting: Boosting correct intuitive reasoning. Cognition, 211. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2021.104645

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Raoelison, M., Boissin, E., Borst, G., & De Neys, W. (2021). From slow to fast logic: The development of logical intuitions. Thinking & Reasoning, 1-25. https://doi.org/10.1080/13546783.2021.1885488

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Janssen, E. M., Raoelison, M., de Neys, W. (2020). "you’re wrong!": The impact of accuracy feedback on the bat-and-ball problem. Acta Psychologica, 206, 103042. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actpsy.2020.103042

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Salvia, E., Mevel, K., Borst, G., Poirel, N., Simon, G., Orliac, F., Etard, O., Hopfensitz, A., Houdé, O., Bonnefon, J.-F., De Neys, W. (2020). Age-related neural correlates of facial trustworthiness detection during economic interaction. Journal of Neuroscience, Psychology, and Economics, 13(1), 19–33. https://doi.org/10.1037/npe0000112

Raoelison, M., Thompson, V. A., De Neys, W. (2020). The smart intuitor: Cognitive capacity predicts intuitive rather than deliberate thinking. Cognition, 204, 104381. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2020.104381

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Raoelison, M., De Neys, W. (2019). Do we de-bias ourselves?: The impact of repeated presentation on the bat-and-ball problem. Judgment and Decision Making, 14(2), 170-178.

Bago, B., Raoelison, M., De Neys, W. (2019). Second-guess: Testing the specificity of error detection in the bat-and-ball problem. Acta Psychologica, 193, 214-228.

Bago, B., De Neys, W. (2019). The intuitive greater good: Testing the corrective dual process model of moral cognition. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 48, 1782-1801.

Mevel, K., Borst, G., Poirel, N., Simon, G., Orliac, F., Etard, O., Houdé, O., De Neys, W. (2019). Developmental frontal brain activation differences in overcoming heuristic bias. Cortex, 117, 111-121.

De Neys, W., Pennycook, G. (2019). Logic, fast and slow: Advances in dual-process theorizing. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 28, 503–509.

Bago, B., Frey, D., Vidal, J., Houdé, O., Borst, G., De Neys, W. (2018). Fast and slow thinking: Electrophysiological evidence for early conflict sensitivity. Neuropsychologia, 117, 483-490.

Lanoë, C., Lubin, A., Houdé, O., Borst, G., De Neys, W. (2017). Grammatical attraction error detection in children and adolescents. Cognitive Development.   

De Neys, W., Hopfensitz, A., Bonnefon, J.-F. (2017). Split-second trustworthiness detection from faces in an economic game. Experimental Psychology, 64, 231-239.

Bonnefon, J.-F., Hopfensitz, A., De Neys, W. (2017). Trustworthiness perception at zero acquaintance: consensus, accuracy, and prejudice. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 40, 24-25. (commentaire)

Bago, B., De Neys, W. (2017). Fast logic?: Examining the time course assumption of dual process theory. Cognition, 158, 90-109.

Bonnefon, J.-F., Hopfensitz, A., De Neys, W. (2017). Can we detect cooperators by looking at their face? Current Directions in Psychological Science, 26, 276-281.

Frey, D., Johnson, E. D., De Neys, W. (2017). Individual differences in conflict detection during reasoning. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 5, 1-52.

Bialek, M., De Neys, W. (2017). Dual processes and moral conflict: Evidence for deontological reasoners’ intuitive utilitarian sensitivity. Judgment and Decision Making, 12, 148-167.

Johnson, E. D., Tubau, E.,  De Neys, W. (2016). The doubting System 1: Evidence for automatic substitution sensitivity. Acta Psychologica, 164, 56-64.

Frey, D., De Neys, W., Bago, B. (2016). The jury of intuition: Conflict detection and intuitive processing. Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, 5, 335-337.

Bialek, M., De Neys, W. (2016). Conflict detection during moral decision making: Evidence for deontic reasoners’ utilitarian sensitivity. Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 28, 631-639.

Mevel, K., Poirel, N., Rossi, S., Cassotti, M., Simon, G., Houdé, O., De Neys, W. (2015). Bias detection: Response confidence evidence for conflict sensitivity in the ratio bias task. Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 27, 227-237.

Lubin, A., Simon, G., Houdé, O., De Neys, W. (2015). Inhibition, conflict detection and number conservation. ZDM : the international journal on mathematics education, 47, 793-800.

Lubin, A., Houdé, O., De Neys, W. (2015). Evidence for children's error sensitivity during arithmetic word problem solving. Learning and Instruction, 40, 1-8.

De Neys, W., Hopfensitz, A., Bonnefon, J. F. (2015). Adolescents gradually improve at detecting trustworthiness from the facial features of unknown adults. Journal of Economic Psychology, 47, 17-22.

Simon, G., Lubin, A., Houdé, O., De Neys, W. (2015). Anterior cingulate cortex and intuitive bias detection during number conservation. Cognitive Neuroscience, 6, 158-168.

Bonnefon, J.-F., Hopfensitz, A., De Neys, W. (2015). Face-ism and kernels of truth in facial inferences. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 19, 421-422. (commentaire)

De Neys, W., Lubin, A., Houdé, O. (2014). The smart non-conserver: Preschoolers detect their number conservation errors. Child Development Research. doi:10.1155/2014/768186

Bonnefond, M., Kaliuzhna, M., Van der Henst, J.B, De Neys, W. (2014). Disabling conditional inferences: An EEG study. Neuropsychologia, 56, 255-262.

De Neys, W. (2014). Conflict detection, dual processes, and logical intuitions: Some clarifications. Thinking Reasoning, 20, 169-187.

De Neys, W., Hopfensitz, A., Bonnefon, J. F. (2013). Low second-to-fourth digit ratio predicts indiscriminate social suspicion, not improved trustworthiness detection. Biology Letters, 9, 20130037. doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2013.0037

De Neys, W., Feremans, V. (2013). Development of heuristic bias detection in elementary school. Developmental Psychology, 49, 258-69.

Trémolière, B., De Neys, W. (2013). Methodological concerns in moral judgment research: Severity of harm shapes moral decisions. Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 25, 989-993.

Lesage, E., Navarette, G., De Neys, W. (2013). Evolutionary modules and Bayesian facilitation: the role of general cognitive resources. Thinking Reasoning, 19, 27-53.

De Neys, W., Bonnefon, J. F. (2013). The whys and whens of individual differences in thinking biases. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 17, 172-178.

De Neys, W., Rossi, S., Houdé, O. (2013). Bats, balls, and substitution sensitivity: Cognitive misers are no happy fools. Psychonomic Bulletin Review, 20, 269-273.

Van Lier, J., Revlin, R., De Neys, W. (2013). Detecting cheaters without thinking: Testing the automaticity of the cheater detection module. PloS ONE, 8, e53827.

Trémolière, B., De Neys, W., Bonnefon, J. F. (2012). Mortality salience and morality: Thinking about death makes people less utilitarian. Cognition, 124, 379-384.

De Neys, W. (2012). Bias and conflict: A case for logical intuitions. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 7, 28-38.

De Neys, W., Glumicic, T. (2008). Conflict monitoring in dual process theories of reasoning. Cognition, 106, 1248-1299.

De Neys, W. (2006). Dual processing in reasoning: Two systems but one reasoner. Psychological Science, 17, 428-433.